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Daily Paintings

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Little glass bottle I bought in the western ghost town of Chloride.
Day 6

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Scottie figurine that lives in my mom’s china closet.
Day 5

I had no idea this daily painting thing was such a thing. I decided to give it a try while on break between semesters so that I can go back as a stronger painter and get to know the medium again. I swear school made me and painting feel like strangers on a bad OKC date.

I came across some other daily painting blogs and also lots of weird articles criticizing the practice(parade rain-ers!). It seems to me other artists do this in order to stay productive, learn how to simplify and to sell. If you rapidly create a batch of small paintings, you have product. Small, minimally labor intensive, product. Which means you can sell them for a low but reasonable price. I may just consider doing that as well. It’d be nice to bring in some money with my artwork.

Here is a list of some other daily painters and their work. Not all of it is necessarily my cup o’ tea, but I like seeing how others approach the practice.

Abbey Ryan
Brian Astle
Lisa Daria
Debbie Becks Cooper
Michael Naples
J Dunster

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Unrequited

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Today I had an unwanted but important realization.

Painting and being unable to get down what you have in your mind feels a lot like unrequited love. It is unrequited love.

Painting badly is rejection. You pine for what’s out of reach. You want what you can’t have, but you keep trying and break your own heart, over and over again

You obsess, torture yourself and sob angry tears. You resent but your intense devotion doesn’t waver.

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I’m glad that I can’t blow up Painting’s phone with too many text messages after midnight, or that I can’t Facebook lurk Painting’s profile page to find out who they might be dating.

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Posing for Artist Angela Cunningham

When I first moved to Western North Carolina I was studying full-time and didn’t have time for a regular job. To earn some extra spending cash, I posed regularly for local artists and drawing groups. I haven’t had the time to do it much lately.

Having a full-time job makes it difficult to be on call, but lately I have been sitting for artist and my former instructor, Angela Cunningham
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It’s a slow process but an amazing one to see come together. Every step is important in order to create a successful end product, which is in this case, a large format all graphite drawing, and perhaps also an oil painting. She’s done a few color studies as well, one of which is shown below.

As a figure model, I never have much expectation or investment in the work completed based on my posing. I know it’s not actually about me. It doesn’t hurt my feelings if the likeness isn’t there, or if it’s not particularly flattering, but sitting for Angela has been a unique pleasure because of her skill. It’s one of the few times I’ve allowed myself some satisfaction and expectation for the final piece. I really can’t wait to see how it turns out and feel honored to be a part of her body of work.


The above is one of my favorite pieces of her work. It is titled Silence. I love this painting not just because it’s beautiful, or that I’m partial to skulls, but also because the moth in the lower right hand corner is a polyphemus moth I found fluttering while it died on a hot night the first summer I had moved here. It reminds me of how exciting that time was and how beautiful, for both good and bad reasons, my experience here has been.

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