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Work and Life, Life and Work

Not much concrete and provable progress to post about, but I’ll try anyway. I’ve been busy at MOCA VA working on photographing the cans coming in for the I Like Soup show opening on May 25. Check out the tentative landing page about the show. All the cans will eventually make it online. The list shown there needs some editing as some people weren’t able to participate, but there is still a lot of awesome to see soon!

Articulated Gallery has updated their online shop with pieces from the Marvelous Humans show curated by Josh of Creepmachine.

As for school I had two pieces on display during the annual student art show. I also one an award in the fine arts category for my painting Focus which I’ll upload to my site soon. If you’d like to see it you can view it and other award winners on my school’s website.

I am also working on redesigning my site. A friend of mine will be assembling it into a working page in the future. This is roughly what it will look like. I looked at many other artists’ sites to get an idea of what I liked and didn’t. I wanted a site that would work as a gallery but still allow me to blog about my process, struggles and art in general.

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Marvelous Humans and I Like Soup shows!

This Saturday at Articulated Gallery in San Francisco is the opening for the Marvelous Humans show curated by Josh Geiser of Creepmachine.com. If you are a local you can RSVP to the Facebook event page.

I also finished customizing my soup can for the I Like Soup show at Virginia MOCA. When the page for the show goes up and more cans start coming in I’ll make another post! Here are some shots of mine. It’s a working kaleidoscope!



Here is a shot of something I’m working on for school. I struggled with the skin tone for a while because I don’t normally paint portraits with so much shadowing, but I think I am getting closer to what I want now.

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Paint Swatchery

This isn’t the most informative post but something I thought was interesting. I’m sure more experienced painters are familiar with this problem. Above I have some color value charts I did for work all using the color green permanent light…and they all look very different.

The top two are similar. The first is Lukas 1862 and the second Winsor Newton. They both are very cool. The middle is Gamblin, after that is Grumbacher and the last is Rembrandt. Gamblin and Rembrandt’s are similar and warmer and the most like the color I have learned to associate with the name permanent green light. The Grumbacher version is the darkest of all. They all have different opacities and finishes also. Gamblin and Winsor Newton dry the most matte while the rest have a bit of gloss.

I think I’m going to start making swatches in my sketchbook to keep track of these odd little varieties. It’s things like these that help create brand loyalty. You learn to use what you expect and how to mix from the brand you are most familiar with. I would be shocked to have used the warmer version for years and then buy another brand and receive something so incredibly different.