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Sticky Lip Wishes and Vampire Hisses

Concepting photo with Cora Dietz and Elizabeth Tolley MUA

It took me forever to get something edited from the shoot I did with Cora Dietz. Jason helped me with most of the editing with his photoshop skills. I was attempting to concept out some future paintings and Cora was awesome enough to help out. Our friend Elizabeth Tolley did her make up and hair.

Le Fanu's Carmilla painted by Leonor Fini

Above is a painting I found by Leonor Fini of Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s lady vampire Carmilla. Bram Stoker is said to be inspired by Le Fanu’s story, so yes, Carmilla is a work older than Dracula. If you are a Vampire Hunter D fan you will probably recognize the name. The villainess in the second movie shares the name.

I honestly am not much of a vampire fan, or at least not of pop culture’s latest incarnation of the vampire. I can’t stand the sight of blood, real or fake. It doesn’t scare me really, but it makes me feel slightly sick and I can’t get the taste of iron out of my mouth when seeing it.

I did enjoy the story of Carmilla though. Atleast from what I’ve read about it and heard in the below linked radio play produced by the horror series Nightfall Have a listen. It’s hosted on my site so you can listen to it on it’s own page or download it.

I won’t bother to describe it except to say that it’s less bloody and more interesting than typical gory vampire fare. I have downloaded the short story to my nook but haven’t read it yet. You can find it online to download here.

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The Artist as Predator

Tribly, artist figure model

If I was good at writing I’d spend a lot of space here talking about how movies and drama have treated the artist as a madman(rather than woman) similarly to the mad scientist of many a horror film and book. The below examples don’t necessarily match that concept, but they are creepy stories featuring artists and art.

Trilby, pictured above and played by Marian Marsh, is a story by George Du Maurier and published in the early 20th century. Trilby, the protagonist, is a young English girl living in Paris and earning a living as a figure model. She is hypnotized by the evil Svengali, a brilliant but villainess musician…

I believe you can watch the movie version of Trilby on Netflix under the title Svengali. Better yet, read it for free through Google books. You can download a pdf of it. I’m honestly only halfway through it and have been reading it on my nook.
Trilby by George Du Maurier

Bluebeard, a story about a man who … ya know, kills his wives, was made into a movie. The villain’s role was changed into that of an artist. He paints portraits of women then murders them. Freaky puppets are also involved. Watch the 1944 version of Bluebeard on Hulu.

I also collect radio horror plays. The two linked below are on topic! The First is a story about two French art students who roam the countryside in search of inspiration. The second play is about a ceramicist searching for a perfect ingredient in order to achieve an unusual glaze to his work. You can download the plays or listen to them online.

Fear on Four’s By the River Fountainebleau

Nightfall’s Glaze of Perfect Beauty

There are many other examples of creepy stories where either the art or artist is menacing, like Oscar Wilde’s Dorian Gray or just about any movie that involves ventriloquists and dummies.