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brand creation, art identity confusion

I’m starting the 2nd semester of my junior year at PAFA. I’m excited. Especially because I have less classes this time around, which means I will have entire days to myself in my studio to get lost in my head and art projects. This semester I have also promised myself to put more time into entering art shows, contests and applying for grants/scholarships. Some of them, the lil’ contests, might require voting, so when they come up, I’ll definitely post them and hope some of you give me a nudge towards school-cash-money.

Something else I hope to accomplish this spring is to re-brand my illustration based work. That means new name, shiny logo, seperate website, all polished into something I want to be a business. It’s my goal to get this up and running by the time I graduate in 2019. Sounds totally doable to me, which is important. Attainable goals keep my engine running.

The idea to separate my illustrative work from this site, my painting and perhaps even me as an individual person, was a bit hard for me to come to, because it feels like everything I do, painting to design, has a cumulative effect on who I am as an artist. This isn’t not true, but from a professional point of view, I know it’s likely the best decision I can make for myself. This blog will stay the same and remain informal. I will definitely update with everything I’m up to, but I will also have an independent brand identity where I only push my stationery and surface design.

Another bonus to more down time means teaching myself to enjoy reading again, specifically art history books. I’m especially enjoying Symbolist Art in Contextby Michelle Facos. It covers that frenetic part of art history as the 1800s shifted into the early 1900s. It’s been a good book to have on hand as I take an online 20th Century art history class.

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unicorns – more childhood scribblings

You can practically hear the dot matrix printer grinding away when looking at these pages!

While in elementary school(Garrettford Elementary was a Great Place to Grow!), I participated in some creative writing classes. Our county schools
also participated in a program/contest called The Young Authors, where every year kids submitted stories they wrote, which were then judged by grade. I loved it and won several times. You can see another of my lil’ stories on my scraps page Scroll to the bottom of the page.

This little book, which I never finished the drawings for all the pages, was from a summer creative writing class. I was likely in 3rd grade at the time. I was really excited when I found this in a box at my parents house. It’s been interesting to see that the themes in my paintings go back so far. Unicorns and skulls.

It’s clear I loved fantasy as a child. My favorite toys were My Little Pony dolls, She-Ra and my Rainbow Brite. This little book was probably a result of watching The Last Unicorn. I also was obsessed with Unico. It was life changing when that came on the Disney channel.

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little anchors – examining the objects i paint

Lotsa squares. Burrows. Flattened crawlspaces.

All these symbols, made of plastic, are populating my studio, photographs and paintings.

I’m putting parts of myself in them. They are reliquaries, produced en masse by Hasbro or Mattel, containing sacred bits of little girl Libby.

I’ve given these pieces to those I love. I’ve left them on doorsteps and beneath pillows. I’ve been like a cat that brings dead birds to her masters.

They are little anchors to drop in another’s life. Sometimes their chains get yanked back.

I’ve left paintings in trees with the hope they’d be found. I’ve left messages with chalk on rocks to be washed away. I’ve made others participate in my scavenger hunt.

When I played with Barbies, I preferred building and designing the doll’s house. I wanted to build the spaces they’d exist in. Maybe I’ve always treated life like a diorama.